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Books, reading material, what's good? what's not?

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  • Books, reading material, what's good? what's not?

    Greetings,

    I wanted to post a list of books that it pays to read, but I also wanted to create a thread where members can add their picks for good books, books that have influenced them.

    My number 1 pick, the best book you can own, and it fits in a gun bag too! Is... Sun Zsu's "The Art Of War"

    This book was written in the 6th Century BC. And if understood and followed, I can't see how you can lose unless your just vastly outnumbered or some other situation that you can't control.

    Another really good book, although a bit hard to understand at times, is "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau.

    And "Odd John" by Olaf Stapeldon is yet another interesting read.

    As far as historical fiction, all of James Clavell's books are excellent!

    So, let's hear it you guys that read, what's good? Oh, and I'm also talking about fiction, historical fiction, even science fiction, it matters not to me.


    Regards,

    Gabrial
    Last edited by gabrial; 01-27-2009, 07:38 AM. Reason: Adding more Books!

  • #2
    +1

    Gabrial,

    Great Idea and an easy way to develop a home library.

    I'll start buy listing four places to look.

    www.bookcloseouts.com (overstocks and damaged)
    www.amazon.com (self explanatory)
    www.powells.com (Used books)
    www.paladin-press.com (black listed at order)

    In my pack right now are two books one that I am re-reading and another that just came in.

    Common Sense, Rights of Man, and Other Essential Writings of Thomas Paine

    The Founders Second Amendment. Origins of the Right to Bear Arms by Stephen Halbrook


    A couple of must haves for everyone,

    Boston's Gun Bible
    The Encyclopedia of Country Living
    The Art of the Rifle
    A Message to Garcia (Marine Corp Required Reading)
    The Gift of Fear (ignore the small of amount of anti-gun theory)
    On Killing by Lt Col Dave Grossman
    Green Eggs and Ham
    KMA - member #07
    Read This ~ Click Here!




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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tacman71 View Post
      Gabrial,
      As far as historical fiction, all of James Clavell's books are excellent!
      Well, I plan to be King Rat after the SHTF.

      KIDDING!!


      Comment


      • #4
        Principles of Personal Defense by Jeff Cooper

        Nation of Cowards by Jeff Snyder
        Tinfoil Hat Alliance - member #073

        Proud to be one of Obama's Bitter, clinging to religion and guns Pennsylvania voters, and I WOULDNT have it any other way!

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        • #5
          Good Books to ready, courtesy of the USMC reading program

          Rifleman Dodd by C.S. Forester
          The Soldierís Load by S.L.A. Marshall
          The Ugly American by W. Burdick
          Enders Game by O.S. Card
          Battle Leadership by A. Von Schell
          Flags of Our Fathers by J. Bradley
          Gates of Fire by S. Pressfield
          Imperial Grunts by R. D. Kaplan
          Tip of the Spear by G.J. Michaels
          Attacks! By E. Rommel
          With the Old Breed by E.B. Sledge
          The Village by B. West
          This Kind of War by T.R. Fehrenbach
          Band of Brothers by S.E. Ambrose
          The Face of Battle by J. Keegan
          A Bell for Adano by J. Hersey
          Utmost Savagery by J. Alexander

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          • #6
            All good sugestions.... add to the list,

            The Holy Bible.

            Wipe your butt with the koran.

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            • #7
              If you want to read just for a good story sci-fi/fantacy Edgar Rice Burroughs created John Carter and Tarzan. Simple easy fast yet very rivitting reading.

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              • #8
                As far as fantasy fiction, I havent found a better writer than R.A. Salvatore (sp?)

                I just started reading him for the first time ever about 3 months ago (amazing I know!) but I have been a voracious reader since about the age of 12. (I'm 37 atm).

                Reading his novels is like drinking water, for lack of a better analogy. easy fast reading that is smooth and amazingly good yet deep and satisfying.

                Gun book? Tactical Pistol Shooting by Eric Lawrence

                Great read and like he says, always keep learning more. Never think you know enough. (paraphrased)
                "A free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government." - George Washington

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                • #9
                  Hello,
                  I'm a squid, so here goes. I recommend "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat, about a corvette crew on convoy escort duty in WWII. Reverse "Das Boot" and much more about human nature than arcane nautical stuff. Some passages will take your breath away....
                  sigpic


                  Read This Troopers ~ Click Here!

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                  • #10
                    I'm currently reading "THE LIBERAL MIND" by Lyle Rossiter, M.D.

                    He's a Board Certified Psychiatrist with amazing credentials who is the first brave scientist to diagnose modern liberalism as a mental disorder. It's a great book so far, and is a great addition to Michael Savage's, "Liberalism is a Mental Disorder".

                    To defeat the enemy, is to know the enemy.

                    I don't ever read fiction. It's a waste of my limited brain capacity.

                    Another must read to understand the subhumans existing amongst us, i.e. the sociopaths, is "The Sociopath Next Door". Written by a Harvard PhD.

                    Every single woman, if not all men, should be forced to read it as a 9th grade assignment. It fully explains psychopaths and how to recognize them. How our minds cannot truly comprehend what these mutants are made of and how their minds work. That they are quite numerous for their untreatable and uncurable sickness. It's absolutely fascinating and eye opening to say the least.
                    the other white meat

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                    • #11
                      Clavell

                      As far as historical fiction, all of James Clavell's books are excellent!

                      2nd Clavell: one that most folks don't know about "A Children's Story". If you don't know it, find it, shows exactly how children and many adults are brainwashed. Literally takes about 30 minutes to read.

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                      • #12
                        This type of thread was started in spring of 2008. but Iíll repost some of my 2 cents worths:

                        ďAnarchy, State, and UtopiaĒ by Robert Nozick.

                        Robert Heinlein Ė especially Tunnel in the Sky and Farmhamís Freehold.

                        Ayn Rand, Milton Friedman, Thomas Sowell, and Edgar Rice Burroughs.

                        "Lights Out" from Frugal squirrels is pretty good.

                        Matthew Bracken's are good. http://www.enemiesforeignanddomestic.com/

                        here's a link to follow: www.survivalblog.com/bookshelf.html

                        many of the books on Rawles' list are on my own as well. Claire Wolfe also has a great book list, though i can no longer find it on her site.

                        Unintended Consequences by John Ross is required reading.

                        Boston's Gun Bible

                        The Encyclopedia of Country Living

                        My Side of the Mountain

                        Michael Williamsonís are great.

                        Terry C. Johnsonís frontier books.



                        This is a short list of those that Iíve enjoyed over the years.
                        Tinfoil Hat Alliance Member

                        THA - 013

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nobamabidenmarxists View Post
                          Another must read to understand the subhumans existing amongst us, i.e. the sociopaths, is "The Sociopath Next Door". Written by a Harvard PhD.

                          Every single woman, if not all men, should be forced to read it as a 9th grade assignment. It fully explains psychopaths and how to recognize them. How our minds cannot truly comprehend what these mutants are made of and how their minds work. That they are quite numerous for their untreatable and uncurable sickness. It's absolutely fascinating and eye opening to say the least.
                          Hmmm, thanks! I will pick this up for sure, human nature and societies effect on the human mind have always fascinated me, I've spent a good part of my life delving into why people react the way they do, and how different events change people in different ways.. But I say again, thanks for the suggestion of this book!

                          R. A. Salvatore does write some excellent books, another series I have enjoyed is E.E. Knight's Vampire Earth books. (About race of aliens that take over the world, and groups of humans gather to resist them. Post Apocalyptic stuff)

                          And thanks for everyone else for providing book suggestions! It gives me some titles to look for when I am shopping discount book shops!

                          Regards,

                          Gabrial

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                          • #14
                            any interest in reviving this thread? I've been doing a lot of reading.

                            Just finished John Grishim's "the racketeers". it was ok, not his best. It seemed like a filler book to meet a publishing contract requirement.

                            Just finished, for about the 8th time, To the Far Blue Mountains by Louis Lamour. Still really like those Sackett books.

                            I am working on "stories from the life of Porter Rockwell" by john rockwell and Jerry Borrowman. will let you know how it is.
                            Tinfoil Hat Alliance Member

                            THA - 013

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                            • #15
                              Message to all.

                              Jon Ball previously recommended Unintended Consequences by John Ross, I give a huge AMEN to that.
                              Guys, this book is an instruction manual on how to disassemble the behemoth. In a nut shell it tells that when the generals run out of grunts and they find themselves in harms way, they find a way to end the conflict. This book tells how to accomplish that end with very little violence. Psychological warfare, the grunts decide that it is not worth it and quit. After that starts to happen the hnic learns that there are many thousands of citizens that have the ability to make a kill shot at over a half mile. To paraphrase, "he suddenly realizes that the ability of thousands of pissed off gun owners may have personal consequences to his well being."
                              The importance of this book cannot be over emphasized. John Ross recently released this book for free kindle reading. I think that time limit has now passed but you should get this book somehow. After all, it was on the FBI"s most wanted to burn list. That should be the most valuable endorsement you could possibly ever need.

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