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Yoders bacon...NOT.. ROLL YOUR OWN

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  • Yoders bacon...NOT.. ROLL YOUR OWN

    If someone else can do it so can you!
    I found this blog and she canned bacon AT HOME

    This is the link http://paratusfamilia.blogspot.com/2...ing-bacon.html


    Also one on reusable canning lids

    http://paratusfamilia.blogspot.com/2...-jar-lids.html

  • #2
    Very cool, that lady has some good ideas and definitely has a good understanding of her role in a household.

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice!!!

      Bookmarked for future reference an new links!

      Comment


      • #4
        Followed on "Google". Good stuff.

        I do, however, like the Yoder bacon still.
        THA - member #069
        KGC - member #11



        WHY ME WHEN THERE IS AN ATHEIST JUST DOWN THE STREET?!?!


        http://www.warrifles.com
        One great place.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by VACSAGOV View Post
          Followed on "Google". Good stuff.

          I do, however, like the Yoder bacon still.
          That stuff sho' is hard to beat ain't it? but doing it like this..... might be just $$$$-wise!

          Comment


          • #6
            We tried this!!

            Ok this is not a long term test HOWEVER my wife tried this and here is what we found.
            We ran out of money and ate our Yoder bacon and it was GOOD but it was fragile and if you didn't want bacon bits you had to handle it carefully!!
            with this information under our belt we followed the instructions on the blog.
            We used thick cut bacon and canned it up!! the next day we had a can for breakfast first from a survival stand point the home caned stuff isn't browned first so you get to keep the bacon grease! this is no small advantage
            second the thick cut stuff was not as fragile a few pieces broke in half where it was folded but they didn't crumble! It took less then 4 minutes to brown in a frying pan.
            it worked great!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Yeah, the Yoders bacon sold by that Crook Steve at MREDepot is razor thin.
              It does not cook up well at all and is very salty with a phony smoked flavor.
              KMA - KGC - THA - #01
              Owner:
              www.WarRifles.com



              '308 Holes Make Invisible Souls'

              'The Path of Excess Leads to the Palace of Wisdom'

              'Crush Your Enemies, See Them Driven Before You, Hear the Lamentations of their Women'



              You cannot invade mainland America.
              There would be a rifle behind every blade of grass.

              Isoroku Yamamoto, Japanese Admiral

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              • #8
                I don't purchased pre prepared disaster foods; all that stuff is WAY too expensive. I might be able to understand throwing some S.O.L.A.S. bars into the glove box if you live in an area where you might be trapped on the road in a blizzard or something but that's about it. I had several cases of MRE's from when I worked hurricane Katrina that me & the crew hadn't opened so I took them home with me. No one else wanted any & the NG guy chunked several cases in my truck two days before we finished up (& several cases of water but we actually used that).

                I think iirc I had seven cases when I got home but I only have a couple left because I open them & take parts of a meal with me fishing or hunting just to have something in my pockets. That's your tax dollars at work....thanks for subsidizing me b.t.w. - I likes da' welfare; I'ma see if I kin git me sum obamamoney next.

                Seriously though, canning yourself is the most economical way to do it. If you can afford the pre-made stuff there's nothing wrong with spending your money on it. I'm too poor to do it & HAVE to can.
                THA - member #069
                KGC - member #11



                WHY ME WHEN THERE IS AN ATHEIST JUST DOWN THE STREET?!?!


                http://www.warrifles.com
                One great place.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Briansammo View Post
                  Yeah, the Yoders bacon sold by that Crook Steve at MREDepot is razor thin.
                  It does not cook up well at all and is very salty with a phony smoked flavor.
                  Thanks for that review, you just saved me from ordering some to try.

                  In a SHTF situation, I can live without bacon.....I wouldn't mind some chocolate though!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I can understand, not wanting to pick up bacon to have as a meal in that it does cost a lot, although I think there are many uses for it, that can be added to other foods, soup, stews, roast, and so on that it would be very useful.

                    if for nothing else making some of the very bland basics (bulk) that I have stored taste a lot better and adding a verity of different things that one can do with a piece of it from time to time to add to the already labored cooking process, if we get to that point.

                    I have put away a good number of the cans of the stuff for just that reason.

                    I also have tried it and it is by no means like buying any of the store stuff, But I did not find it as bad as apparently some have. I felt it was a good additive to my preps.

                    Now sense some one has tried caning it themselves, and seems to be successful for much less money I will investigate that way of adding to what I already have to see if it is a better way to put away meats.


                    it is fairly easy to prep most of the others things we need, but meat seems to be a lot harder and cost much more. I also believe that meat will be one of the things that will be almost impossible to get when the time comes.

                    It will be impossible to keep, with out refrigeration, So I am looking at other ways to provide a little along the way, however long that is.

                    I believe the closer to normal living we can have. The fewer things that we will need to change in order to survive the more likely we will survive.

                    I guess I am going at it a little differently than a lot of people, But I have always been fairly successful with preventive planning. And I do not see this any differently. I don't plan on running through the bush with a back pack with a few days supplies and living off the land. I am too old for that. I am going to try and let knowledge, preparedness training, and prayer take me through. Along with a little powder and lead if necessary.

                    Just my thoughts,
                    A very wise Preper told me:

                    You can show others what can be done

                    You can show them how to get there

                    You can help them get there

                    But if they choose not to you can't force them

                    The harder you try the more they will resist

                    And I have never seen any more truth said

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Scoutmaster View Post
                      It will be impossible to keep, with out refrigeration, So I am looking at other ways to provide a little along the way, however long that is.
                      See thats what I don't understand...
                      They had massive cattle drives in the past and people had meat on their farms... they sugar cured it, they salted it (IIRC)..They let it dry in meat curing sheds.... they stored it SOME way.... there HAS to be a way to store meat.... It wasn't an invention just in the last century.

                      Now will it be Omaha Steaks great???? probably not. but theres gotta be a way and that way is on my list of finding out....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ask for and ye shall receive...


                        Meat curing in burlap sacks....

                        http://www.sugarmountainhome.com/liv...uringmeat.html
                        Using methods from an old canning and freezing cook book, we found that curing meat is not really that difficult. Meat should be cured when it's cold out, in November, December, or January. Here, it's usually too warm in November. In 1999, it was still too warm here in December. Cold weather is a must, unless you own a walk-in cooler or just have an extra refrigerator hanging around. In 1999/2000, we cured our hams and bacon in an extra refrigerator in the basement. By 2001, we were using the old ways, hanging in the tree in burlap bags.

                        There are two ways to cure meat, smoke and sugar cure. Temperature is one of the most important factors. Cold is a must, after slaughtering, before cutting the meat, and during smoking and curing. If a smokehouse gets much above 100 degrees Fahrenheit, the heat will destroy the enzymes in the meat that develop the aged flavor.

                        It's important to keep meats in a cool place for several days after the curing process to give the salt time to penetrate throughout. Failure to do this can cause spoilage. Salt penetrates as it dissolves in the moisture of the meat. SALT is the ingredient that provides the cure. SUGAR adds flavor and helps retard the hardening action of the salt. SALTPETER brings out and retains the reddish color of the meat. Morton makes a pre-mixed sugar cure that can be purchased in 5-pound bags which have printed instructions on the bag. It also contains a smoke flavoring. This year, our local grocery did not have that available, so we went to the Butcher Shop and bought 5 pounds of the sugar cure that they use.

                        Successful Sugar Cure: Chill meat quickly and keep it cold during the whole curing process, 38 - 40 degrees Fahrenheit. Lower temperatures will interfere with penetration of the salt. Higher temperatures may cause spoilage. If the temperatures fall below freezing during your cure, add that number of days on to the curing time.

                        Weigh/measure carefully. Use NON-iodized salt, flaked or granulated but make sure it is NOT iodized. Canning salt works well, but non-iodized salt can be bought in the regular spice section at your store and is usually cheaper than regular salt. Use exact measurements.

                        Allow enough curing time for the meat to absorb the salt. Keep careful track of the curing time. If you cut it short, the meat may spoil. If you cure too long, the meat loses quality. Keep meat under refrigeration or hanging in a cold place (38 to 45 degrees F) after curing to dry and to give the salt time to spread evenly throughout the meat........

                        Before the year 2000 hit, we were asked by friends of ours if we knew ways to put up meat. We have recipes for home canning meat also. We recently gave some canning classes that included butchering & canning chicken.

                        Morton Tender Quick Meat Cure


                        http://www.americanspice.com/catalog...Meat_Cure.html
                        Morton Tender Quick Meat Cure
                        View Enlarged Image
                        Morton Tender Quick is a blend of salt, sugar and other meat curing ingredients formulated for fast cure action and improved flavor and color. Morton Tender Quick is ideal for curing, brine curing, or making a pumping pickle.

                        http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/cooke...ill.5673092.jp
                        "Curing and smoking has a long history in the UK and was the way to preserve meat for the winter" says David.

                        "Traditionally the pig was slaughtered in the autumn. The blood was used to make black pudding, the best cuts of meat would be eaten fresh and the other parts of the animal were then used to make ham and bacon.

                        "The liver and other left over cuts would be used to make pâté, potted meats and terrines. Now we have refrigeration, we don't need to preserve meat. We still do because it gives meat a deep, delicious flavour".

                        David makes his own sausages, bacon and hams.

                        "There are two traditional types of ham. The first is Wiltshire ham which is brine cured and sold all year round. The second is York ham, which is dry cured for Christmas. The salt draws the moisture from the meat and prevents bacteria from breeding. York ham has been salted for six days and then aged for several months. Gammon bought in the supermarket has been cured for about a week."

                        Some hams, such as Serrano, are cured for at least 14 months and the flavour develops over time.

                        David also produces delicious smoked, black bacon which is brine cured with beer, molasses and juniper berries.

                        "People are fascinated by making their own sausages " says David, who will soon be on hand to show us all how to make a whole range of charcuterie...
                        http://www.helium.com/items/1245940-how-to-cure-meats
                        HISTORY OF CURING MEATS

                        Early primitive societies from the Neolithic age used a simple method of preservation through the use of smudge fires that were built under racks of strips of drying meats. Another method which began in the early days before the birth of Christ preserved meat by "salt curing" to keep it for long periods of time. In the middle of the 9th century B.C., the use of nitrates which contained salt was being used to preserve also. But the earliest documentation of curing meat was from the early Greek civilizations, who taught the Romans the art of curing meat through the use of nitrates, even though it was not well-understood until the 1900s.



                        Eventually methods of hanging meats in trees during the cooler months were used but were considered somewhat inadequate because meat deteriorated soon after butchering and bleeding the animal if it was too warm. Hanging meats for preservation was dependent on the cooler temperatures below 85 degrees because molds, bacteria, or even yeasts would develop in the meat's tissues. Other sources of meat deterioration were dirty knives used for butchering or puncturing the inner organs, and improper cleaning methods of the curing equipment.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tareece View Post
                          See thats what I don't understand...
                          They had massive cattle drives in the past and people had meat on their farms... they sugar cured it, they salted it (IIRC)..They let it dry in meat curing sheds.... they stored it SOME way.... there HAS to be a way to store meat.... It wasn't an invention just in the last century.

                          Now will it be Omaha Steaks great???? probably not. but theres gotta be a way and that way is on my list of finding out....
                          Of course there's ways to cure it (food) without refrigeration.

                          I have a paper bag full of beef I smoke/salt cured back in April sitting in front of me on my desk right now. I intended to go for a two week, camp - hike - fish - swim - rappel - spelunk -squirrel hunt - K.G.C. cache finding expedition that got put off until next week (my nephew is going with for a week & he couldn't get free until then).

                          I'm going to dry a couple more pounds over the hickory smoke this week because I've been nibbling at what I made in April ever since I made it (can't keep my youngest daughter out of it either). I'm also going to dry some potato slices, carrots, onion & mushrooms to add in with the dried milk I'm taking (I bought the milk at Walmart) so I can make a hearty stew a couple times a week.

                          I've had meat I dried over hickory smoke last for a year & it might have lasted longer but I ate it. Also I don't have anything special, just a regular Weber grill, no fancy schmancy smoker. It's easier than people make it out to be.
                          THA - member #069
                          KGC - member #11



                          WHY ME WHEN THERE IS AN ATHEIST JUST DOWN THE STREET?!?!


                          http://www.warrifles.com
                          One great place.

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                          • #14
                            The South African way

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biltong

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                            • #15
                              Tareece and Christopher, thanks for the links. The bacon canning link had one for canning butter that I had asked about years back, but no one really had an answer for, and if I'm fortunate enough this year while deer hunting, I'll try curing a shoulder.

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