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Yoders bacon...NOT.. ROLL YOUR OWN

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  • #16
    Not sure if it has ever been mentioned but CMMG makes "Tactical Bacon" canned and I would think it should last as long as spam. Supposedly, there was a company that used to can bacon (and other meats) for small ocean going vessels with limited refrigeration but there business went away when smaller lighter and more efficient refers became available to smaller vessels. Point being, it was done for years and the techniques, like so many others, have been lost to modern society.

    Tactical Bacon: When your spouse is known for bringing home the "Tactical Bacon",,, he or she must have a pretty good job because this stuff is pricey.

    http://cmmginc.secure-mall.com/item/...cal-Bacon-1325

    BTW, I have no affiliation with CMMG.

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    • #17
      Great stuff

      Thanks Tareece, and the bacon caning woman...I wanna marry her
      My kinda gal.

      Look at what the Italians do with salami, they air cure it
      so yes, we need to learn these fine "lost" arts. the nwo has some most dastardly plans for US, and we must be prepared.
      The slimy Brits could not whip US...in a fight ( got us real good on the banking swindle though), and nor will the sleaze of the Heinz variety.

      Long live American ingenuity and long live her Citizens

      PS i've made jerky in the oven for years

      PSS I think that in addition to curing the meat in the tree, a few congresscrittens hanging out with the meat is a grqand idea, kinda like 2 fer one

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Briansammo View Post
        Yeah, the Yoders bacon sold by that Crook Steve at MREDepot is razor thin.
        It does not cook up well at all and is very salty with a phony smoked flavor.
        In case you don't go the canning route, Yoders Bacon is now offered at "Emergency Essentials". Price is still the same ($12) a can as at MRE Depot. Have been purchasing my preps from EE ever since Steve treated us here badly. dozier

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        • #19
          Can your own meat

          Originally posted by Scoutmaster View Post
          It will be impossible to keep, with out refrigeration, So I am looking at other ways to provide a little along the way, however long that is.

          Just my thoughts,
          I bought a pressure cooker at WM and several cases of quart jars.
          About twice a month I look thru the sales and buy what ever meat that is on sale. Ground beef, chicken, turkey, steak, sausages, it does not matter. The meat goes in the jar raw, top it with broth or V8 and pressure cook for 90 minutes. The meat is tender and delicious and does not need refrigeration. It will keep for years if the initial seal is good
          I have put up about 4 months of meals so far, 7 jars at a time

          Old cook books have the recipies.

          My wife loves the canned meat. When we are tired and don't want to cook supper, open a jar, heat in the microwave, make some rice or potatoes and done!!!
          I was lucky enough to learn from Granny. Dreaded the chores at the time but now I thank her each and every time.
          CLINGING........... to my gun and Bible

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          • #20
            A few questions.

            * Is Yoders Bacon a bad deal or bad product?

            * I save bacon grease in the fridge for use in many things like beans and frying eggs. Can you can bacon grease in a pressure cooker and if so, how.

            One drawback to cooking bacon in a grid down situation is the smell travels miles and makes me hungry just thinking about it.

            I also fry up a few pounds after dicing it and put the diced and drained bacon in the freezer in a coffee can so I have real bacon bits to use in many dishes.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by RCSAR View Post
              A few questions.

              * Is Yoders Bacon a bad deal or bad product?

              * I save bacon grease in the fridge for use in many things like beans and frying eggs. Can you can bacon grease in a pressure cooker and if so, how.

              One drawback to cooking bacon in a grid down situation is the smell travels miles and makes me hungry just thinking about it.

              I also fry up a few pounds after dicing it and put the diced and drained bacon in the freezer in a coffee can so I have real bacon bits to use in many dishes.
              The Yoder's canned bacon that I bought in the past was actually reasonable. I haven't tried any of the CMMG branded cans. The Yoders brand is not popular here anymore because of the unethical action of a vendor...

              Storing fat requires rendering first. Once properly rendered you have a number of storage options. Bacon fat is one that I personally haven't tried to render yet, but I've rendered regular untreated pork fat without any problems. I found this link that looks legit, might be worth a try:

              http://cooklikeyourgrandmother.com/2...ore-bacon-fat/

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              • #22
                Originally posted by RCSAR View Post
                A few questions.

                * Is Yoders Bacon a bad deal or bad product?

                * I save bacon grease in the fridge for use in many things like beans and frying eggs. Can you can bacon grease in a pressure cooker and if so, how.

                One drawback to cooking bacon in a grid down situation is the smell travels miles and makes me hungry just thinking about it.

                I also fry up a few pounds after dicing it and put the diced and drained bacon in the freezer in a coffee can so I have real bacon bits to use in many dishes.
                I have several cases of it, and have tried several cans. I like it and it is a good source for meat and fat. It is of decent quality. But we did have a problem with the vender, maybe picking it up from some other place if a person can't make there own, I am a little worried to try and make store my own.
                A very wise Preper told me:

                You can show others what can be done

                You can show them how to get there

                You can help them get there

                But if they choose not to you can't force them

                The harder you try the more they will resist

                And I have never seen any more truth said

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tareece View Post
                  See thats what I don't understand...
                  They had massive cattle drives in the past and people had meat on their farms... they sugar cured it, they salted it (IIRC)..They let it dry in meat curing sheds.... they stored it SOME way.... there HAS to be a way to store meat.... It wasn't an invention just in the last century.

                  Now will it be Omaha Steaks great???? probably not. but theres gotta be a way and that way is on my list of finding out....
                  The thing is, what we think of as "cured" meats today is, in principle, the same as in days gone by, but there were differences. Salt cure was saltier - MUCH saltier. The salt pork given the troops in the Civil War was more like eating a salt block than a piece of preserved meat. Dried was DRY. As in cardboard dry. A piece of beef jerky from the old Chisholm Trail was hard enough you could sharpen one end and use it for a tent stake.

                  Sugar cure did not really come into being until we had basic refrigeration in the form of ice boxes. While sugar keeps salt cure from hardening the meat, it also encourages mold and bacterial growth, so sugar cured meat needs refrigeration, even though it is supposedly "preserved". But since we had refrigeration, we could depend as much (MORE!) on the cold temperatures as the preservative nature of the salt to keep the meat edible. Sugar cured jerky is only good for a few weeks unless you refrigerate it, or add other preservatives like BHT. The bacon of today is so minimally cured (in the traditional sense) that it will even mold in a refrigerator. Ham, also. Want to keep ham or bacon more than a few weeks after opening the vacuum pack, you have to freeze it. But a ham or side cured in the 1800s would last months at temperatures reached by cooling the shed with running water of a creek. (ie: much warmer than our modern refrigerators, or even the old ice boxes.)

                  Want to preserve your meat so it will be edible months later at merely cool (instead of cold) temperatures, be prepared to not like it very well. We are vastly spoiled ourselves because with modern refrigeration and chemical preservatives, we have the luxury of keeping our meats close to original flavor, adding only those flavors we enjoy. Not so in the days of yore. If you want to use the methods they used, you will also need to find and learn the cooking methods they used to deal with the high levels of salt they used, and the zero-moisture hardness of their dried meats. I know they used to boil salt cured side meat (bacon) or ham to leach out most of the salt before they cooked it further (fried, baked, stewed, etc.) in a meal.

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                  • #24
                    paratusfamilia

                    This lady has a bunch of articles on canning all kinds of odd stuff, bacon, hard cheese, butter, and cream cheese. Her bacon article was in Backwoods Home mag.
                    http://paratusfamilia.blogspot.com/search/label/Canning
                    Her site is a good read overall too. Her husband is a lucky man.

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